Mixtape Notes to the Shadows

MIXTAPE NOTES TO THE SHADOWS is a confrontation. A reckoning with ghosts. An exorcism experience in photography, video art, storytelling and performance.

Recounting critical moments in childhood and young adulthood, JOSEPHINE KUUIRE and SIONNE RAMEAH NEELY weave together their own experiences as survivors of sexual violence to unveil how the aftermath of sexual trauma can be a lifelong struggle. This work-in- process explores such challenges and their connections to racial violence, cultural conformity, depression, and physical illness.

MIXTAPE NOTES TO THE SHADOWS is a ritual of remaking – a flipping open of the door on secret sisterhoods of suffering to see what happens when we choose to create our own routes to reflection, healing, freedom and joy.

 

There will be also be a Q&A with the artists led by Rita Nketiah, feminist scholar-activist and Knowledge Management Specialist at the African Women’s Development Fund.

About the Artists

Josephine Ngminvielu Kuuire is a photographer and a digital artist living and practicing in Ghana. She received her bachelor’s Degree in Social Work and Music from the University of Ghana in 2015. Josephine is usually inspired by everyday experiences and uses photography to interrogate established social systems within the Ghanaian context particularly through the techniques of manipulation and distortion. Her works explore Ghana by questioning influences by popular culture, religion, ethnic traditions, colonial imperialism and amnesia.

Sionne Rameah Neely is a womanist researcher, writer, teacher and multimedia producer. She is co-creator of ACCRA [dot] ALT and co-director of the CHALE WOTE Street Art Festival. Since 2005, Sionne has completed more than 250 interviews with African musicians, artists and cultural producers. In 2010, Sionne received a doctorate from the University of Southern California (U.S.) in American Studies and Ethnicity. Her research revolves around independent arts organising, African women’s rights, African feminism, the rights of artists, the history of music production in Ghana and pan-African recollections of the transatlantic slave trade.

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